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Top 10 NSFW Nude Album Covers

08.07.2012

Nudity and music go together like peanut butter and jelly, so it makes sense that there would be some general nakedness going on in album art. Hell, the only reason we probably don’t see it more often is because we live in a society…with rules. And until anarchy rains down upon us like a cleansing flood of pure chaos, we’ll have to make do with less boob and more Bieber.

Still, every once in a while, we get a glimpse of our clothes-less future in the form of full-frontal album covers. These are covers that aren’t afraid of a little penis or sexual innuendo; covers with (sometimes literal) hair on their chests. Banned covers so nudity-filled that they have caused society to stop and take notice.

We’re all adults here, right? A little bare breast isn’t going to ruin our day. So, Verbicide presents to you the top 10 nude album covers.

Nevermind

 

Nivana, Nevermind

 

While the album cemented Nirvana‘s G.O.A.T. status, Nevermind‘s cover became one of the most ubiquitous symbols of our money-obsessed culture. According to lore, Nirvana’s label prepared a second version of the cover, in case the nudity was deemed too offensive. In response, Kurt Cobain suggested a compromise, demanding that a sticker be placed over the penis that read, “If you’re offended by this, you must be a closet pedophile.” Thankfully, the cover was released unaltered.


 

Cut

 

The Slits, Cut

 

In this debut release from British punk rockers The Slits, the ladies looked to make an impression with a subversively sexy mashup of Barbarella and “National Geographic.”


 

Blind Faith

 

Blind Faith, S/T

Blind Faith was famous for two things: being a super-group consisting Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, and Steve Winwood, and for this cover depicting a nude 11-year-old girl playing with a very phallic airplane. Fueled by claims of child pornography, dubious rumors surfaced claiming that the child was either Baker’s daughter or that the band kept her as a slave. In truth, she was the younger sister of the original cover model, who, true to her age, asked for a horse as payment. Instead, she was paid £40.


 

Two Virgins

 

John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Two Virgins

Released the same year as The BeatlesThe White Album, Two Virgins represented a chaotic, experimental era in John Lennon’s music, consisting of tape loops, sound effects, and distortion. As legend has it, Lennon’s personal life was similarly chaotic, having left his wife Cynthia for Yoko Ono, then abandoning Ono for new mistress, May Pang, all blanketed by John’s history of violent domestic abuse.

The cover photo, taken using time-delay, was quickly censored upon release. Lennon supposedly believed that this was less because of the nudity and more because the photo was unflattering. Ironically, the image was meant to represent virginal innocence, symbolically lost after the recording of the album when Lennon and Ono consummated their relationship.


 

Electric Ladyland

 

The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Electric Ladyland

When Electric Lady Land was set for release, Hendrix wrote a letter to Reprise Records detailing what he wanted the cover art to be: a color photo by Linda Eastman of the band sitting with children on a sculpture from Alice in Wonderland in Central Park. Instead, the American label used the now-iconic blurred red and yellow photo of Hendrix’s head. Hendrix’s UK label, Track Records, also created a cover that ignored his wishes. The image featured 19 nude women lounging in front of a black background, which Hendrix disapproved of, as it was antithetical to the cover art he had intended.

 

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